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ID
17-509-1415
Name
Radiological Operations Support Specialist
Status
Published
Updated
10/22/2019 10:46:05 AM
Released
10/22/2019
Resource Category
Screening, Search, and Detection
Primary Core Capability
Situational Assessment
Secondary Core Capability
 
Resource Kind
Personnel
Overall Function
The Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS): 1. Provides subject-matter expertise and guidance on questions about radiation, the environment, hazard modeling, data and risk management, public protective actions and other scientific and technical issues to incident response leaders at any level 2. Gathers, organizes, synthesizes, documents and distributes incident and resource information to improve situational awareness at all levels of incident management 3. Is able to clearly explain the implications of modeling, measurement and analysis methods, as well as the health risks and hazards that exist during a radiological or nuclear incident 4. May function as a ROSS Strike Team Leader when serving as a Type 1 or Type 2 ROSS as part of a ROSS Strike Team
Single resource
In conjunction with a NIMS typed team
NIMS Typed Team
 
In conjunction with a NIMS typed unit
NIMS Typed Unit
 
Description Notes
When serving as part of a ROSS Strike Team, a NIMS Type 1 or Type 2 ROSS may also function as a team leader.
Supporting Core Capabilities
None
Types
Type Description
Type 1Same as Type 2, PLUS: 1. Has the capacity to work at the Incident Command Post (ICP) and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) levels and to advise Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) and elected officials 2. Helps the AHJ integrate Federal radiological response assets and capabilities from across the government into the response, as necessary 3. Coordinates radiological activities and technical data management with other ROSS staff and Federal response assets across the incident 4. Integrates into a state’s EOCs and coordinates with the radiological control authority 5. Supports radiological response preparedness activities and exercises at the state and local levels 6. May manage multiple ROSS Strike Team Leaders engaged in a variety of radiological response activities, including human dose and environmental impact projection and assessment, and maintaining a consistent radiological situational awareness 7. Manages various ROSS Strike Team activities as the AHJ requests, such as: a. Incident response activities b. Public and emergency worker dose data collection and reduction, for dose management in large populations c. Management of geographically and temporally extensive environmental sampling d. Coordination of radiochemical analysis of samples e. Radiological safety guidance to emergency support functions engaged in lifesaving f. Restoration of critical infrastructure g. Decontamination of people and places h. Radioactive waste management
Type 2Same as Type 3, PLUS: 1. Creates exposure estimates for a variety of internal and external exposure scenarios 2. Understands key state and Federal radiological response assets, capabilities, and reporting structures, and integrates them into an effective response 3. Communicates complex radiological issues to large groups and senior managers, and supports public message development 4. Helps develop Incident Action Plans (IAP) that balance complex radiological safety concerns with mission priorities 5. Works closely with command staff and emergency management teams 6. Works effectively with other ROSS staff when part of a ROSS Strike Team, or when serving as a ROSS Strike Team Leader, to synthesize large amounts of radiological data from a variety of response and recovery resources to ensure a common radiological operating picture across all affected jurisdictions 7. May coordinate with state and local decision makers to provide necessary radiological assessments of health and environmental impacts
Type 3The National Incident Management System (NIMS) Type 3 ROSS: 1. Works as a technical specialist and advises response personnel and AHJ on issues pertaining to radiological and nuclear (rad/nuc) response 2. Provides radiological incident assessment and resource information through: a. Interpreting and communicating model and measurement results and data products b. Proficient use of the RadResponder mobile app and website to collect and share data 3. Has knowledge of state radiation control programs and other radiological emergency preparedness assets, as well as key Federal radiological response assets 4. Exchanges technical information with other ROSS staff in the response and advisory organizations to ensure effective communication of protection guidance 5. When part of a ROSS Strike Team: Reports to a ROSS Strike Team Leader and works within a ROSS Strike Team at an ICP or other incident management center to ensure the use of a common radiological operating picture throughout the response and recovery periods for compatible, effective decision-making across all affected jurisdictions 6. Helps develop command post-level objectives for implementing protective actions and emergency worker protections on a unit-by-unit level 7. Guides radiological aspects of response during the incident by having: a. A working knowledge of radiological protection guidance and best practices, including how best to apply the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) Response Guidance, FEMA Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery guidance and other rad/nuc emergency response and recovery guidance b. The ability to obtain updated/additional radiological advice and recommendations from appropriate advisory organizations 8. Helps responding agencies and agency decision makers use the RadResponder website to maintain situational awareness of radiological aspects of the incident 9. Communicates radiological issues to nontechnical audiences and provides first responders with just-in-time training on the RadResponder mobile app and website, monitoring devices and safety protocols 10. Effectively integrates into the Incident Command System (ICS) structure
Components
Component Notes  
EducationIn lieu of an undergraduate degree, a NIMS Type 3 ROSS may substitute training and five years of experience as a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 472 Hazardous Materials Technician Specialist Employee A with a specialty in radioactive materials and/or weapons of mass destruction or equivalent, as the AHJ determines.
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1One of the following: 1. Graduate degree in a radiation-related field 2. Successful completion of part 1 of the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP) certification exam 3. Equivalent experience, as the AHJ determines
Type 2One of the following: 1. Bachelor’s degree in science, technology, engineering, mathematics or a radiation-related field, such as health physics, nuclear engineering or radiological science 2. National Registry of Radiation Protection Technologists (NRRPT) certification 3. Equivalent experience, as the AHJ determines
Type 3One of the following: 1. Associate’s degree in a radiation-related field, such as health physics, nuclear engineering or radiological science 2. NRRPT certification
TrainingNot Specified
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1Same as Type 2, PLUS: 1. ICS-400: Advanced Incident Command System for Command and General Staff – Complex Incidents 2. LN-200: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Liaison Skills Lab, or equivalent 3. PER-905: Advanced Radiological Incident Operations, or equivalent
Type 2Same as Type 3, PLUS: 1. ICS-300: Intermediate Incident Command System for Expanding Incidents 2. E/L/G 0191: Emergency Operations Center/Incident Command System Interface, or equivalent 3. PER-316: Radiological Accident Assessment, or equivalent 4. PER-904: Radiological Emergency Response Operations, or equivalent 5. Training or experience in Turbo FRMAC to the level equivalent to a Department of Energy (DOE) FRMAC Assessment Scientist 6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiological Assessment System for Consequence Analysis (RASCAL) course, or equivalent 7. RESRAD-RDD course, or equivalent
Type 3Completion of the following: 1. IS-100: Introduction to the Incident Command System, ICS-100 2. IS-200: Basic Incident Command System for Initial Response, ICS-200 3. IS-700: National Incident Management System, An Introduction 4. IS-800: National Response Framework, An Introduction 5. IS-836: Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex 6. Counterterrorism Operations Support (CTOS) PER-307: Introduction to Improvised Nuclear Device Effects and Response Strategies (web based or instructor led) 7. PER-325-W: RadResponder Mobile App 8. RadResponder website version webinars (Chainbridge Technologies) 9. LN-100: FRMAC Liaison Fundamentals, or equivalent 10. MGT-455: Radiological Operations Support Specialist (ROSS) Training 11. Radiation protection/emergency response training in accordance with at least one of the following: a. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.120: Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response b. Advanced training to the level equivalent to an American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) 3.1 Radiation Protection Technician c. Hazardous Materials Technician Specialist Employee A with a specialty in radioactive materials and/or weapons of mass destruction, as defined in NFPA 472: Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents d. Hazardous Materials Specialist III training as defined by the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME)
ExperienceNot Specified
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1Same as Type 2, PLUS: Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities: Working knowledge of plume projection/dose assessment modeling and software, such as RASCAL, HotSpot, and RESRAD, as demonstrated in training or exercises Experience: 1. Successful completion of the National Qualification System (NQS) for the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Type 1 Radiological Operations Support Specialist, or equivalent AHJ documentation 2. Three additional years of experience as an operational health physicist, with extensive emergency preparedness and response experience and detailed knowledge of Federal and state radiological response agencies and capabilities 3. Successful development and implementation of at least three additional separate rad/nuc emergency training sessions for first responders or other emergency management personnel
Type 2Same as Type 3, PLUS: 1. Successful completion of the National Qualification System (NQS) for the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Type 2 Radiological Operations Support Specialist, or equivalent AHJ documentation 2. Experience in a radiological response and advisory role during national exercises such as Vibrant Response 3. Three years of experience as an operational health physicist or radiation safety officer, with emergency response experience and training in the Federal radiological response framework 4. Successful development and implementation of at least three separate rad/nuc emergency training sessions for first responders or other emergency management personnel
Type 31. Successful completion of the National Qualification System (NQS) for the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Type 3 Radiological Operations Support Specialist, or equivalent AHJ documentation 2. Experience in a radiological response and advisory role during radiological emergency preparedness exercises for nuclear power plants, community reception centers or other radiological incidents (such as Vigilant Guardian) 3. Successful completion of at least two tabletop exercises or other exercises demonstrating the radiological response and advisory role—such as the Silent Thunder series, the Isotope Crossroads series, or FEMA’s Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) exercises 4. Practical experience working with, and making measurements of, radioactive materials or radiation generating devices 5. Emergency response experience and training in the Federal radiological response framework
Physical/Medical FitnessThe NIMS Guideline for the NQS defines Physical/Medical Fitness levels for NQS positions.
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1Same as Type 2
Type 2Moderate
Type 3Arduous
CurrencyNot Specified
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1Same as Type 2, PLUS: Functions in this position during an operational incident, exercise, drill, simulation, or planned event at least annually
Type 2Same as Type 3
Type 31. Functions in this position during an operational incident, exercise, drill, simulation, or planned event at least once every two years 2. Maintains currency in all relevant NIMS, ICS, and hazardous materials (HAZMAT) training 3. Attends at least eight hours of ROSS refresher training or continuing education every two years 4. Maintains proficiency in critical tools, including RadResponder, the ROSS Toolkit and CMweb
Professional and Technical Licenses and CertificationsNot Specified
Component Types
Type Criteria
Type 1Successful completion of part 1 of the AAHP exam, or equivalent experience
Type 2Not Specified
Type 3Not Specified
Composition and Ordering Specifications
Specification
Requestor specifies any additional qualifications necessary based on incident complexity and needs
Discuss logistics for deploying this position, such as working conditions, length of deployment, security, lodging, transportation, and meals, prior to deployment
1173
Notes
References
Reference
FEMA, National Qualification System (NQS) Position Task Book for Radiological Operations Support Specialist, latest edition adopted
FEMA, National Incident Management System (NIMS), October 2017
FEMA, NIMS Guideline for the NQS, November 2017
FEMA, National Response Framework, June 2016
FEMA, Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery: Communicating in the Immediate Aftermath, latest edition adopted
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) Response Guidance, latest edition adopted
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides and Planning Guidance for Radiological Incidents, latest edition adopted
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 472: Standard for Competence of Responders to Hazardous Materials/Weapons of Mass Destruction Incidents, latest edition adopted
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.120: Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response, latest edition adopted